Aerial View

From 2 November 2012
To 13 January 2013

Private View Invite 

Exhibition Price list

 

Introduction:

Artists Lucy Bainbridge, Neil Bottle, Quona Bullivant, Gerry Buxton, Brian Hodgson, Letitia Tunstall, Andy Tuohy and Mandy Quy- Verlander display an array of artworks based on architectural and industrial structures in various media.

Evoking a strong sense of place and memory, the works on show make reference to buildings, landscapes and cityscapes.

 

Press Release:

Press Release Aerial View

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press Coverage:

Visit Kent, Visit ThanetCity Freeloader, Isle One, Art Rabbit, Isle of Thanet Gazette, Margate Old Town Website, insideKENT magazine,

 

 

 

 

 

 

Private View Photographs (Fri 2 Nov 2012):


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installation Photographs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Biographies and Works in Exhibition:

Quona Bullivant:

My work is frequently based on the sculptural qualities of industrial structures and how they live within our urban and rural landscape – becoming somewhat invisible through familiarity.

I often focus on a single aspect of the whole – using the abstract form to emphasise height and power.  I find the use of a limited palette and the elimination of incidentals heightens the ethereal, sometimes unearthly presence of these structures.

One of my many influences is Charles Sheeler the American Realist who accentuated the formal detail of the industrial – and another, the contemporary artist Luc Tuymans for his choice of tonal balance and limited palette.

My purpose is not to romanticise or to judge. But, perhaps, instead, create a tension within the viewer…………….. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letitia Tunstall – Printmaker:

‘Cityscapes’

Exploring  the emotional significance of landscape. Repeatedly reworking the surface of the monoprint revealing layers of colour and markmaking to record that which the eye cannot see in order to evoke a sense of place.

The compilation, elimination and layering processes have suggestions of a natural process and allow a personal interpretation of meaning.

      

‘Traces’

The past embedded in the present.

The intervention of memory and time filters through this work depicting partially forgotten places and half remembered stories.

    

‘Unframed works’

 

 

 

 

 

Gerry Buxton

I am a photographer, illustrator and print maker. My works in this series are all based on my photographs of iconic Londoners’ buildings, the buildings Londoners’ navigate by and love without really knowing what goes on in them.

I am drawn to the brutalist buildings and the changing relationship we have with them. I love the honesty and simplicity of these buildings, the brutal logic of them as the conclusion of the Bauhaus mantra ‘form follows function.’ I think these buildings are the ultimate expression of function. In that purity of function there is a truth, and in truth there is beauty. In the prints I have made the buildings the star of the show and tried to present that beauty.

Erno Goldfinger’s ‘Trellick Tower’, so derided at the time Ian Fleming named his eponymous bond villain after the architect, is now a very prestigious and desirable address.

The Barbican centre voted London’s ugliest building in 2003 stands up and stands out as monument to a peculiar 70’s vision of the future. It’s a brutally honest building in the true mould of Le Corbusier’s assertion of ‘the building as a machine for living’ and in this it asserts its place as one of the few inner city buildings that transcends the gap between the industrial and the architectural.

 

Andy Tuohy

Andy trained as a graphic designer at Liverpool Polytechnic (now John Moores) and worked in publishing and advertising for many years before going it alone as an artist designer. At the same time as going freelance he decided to take the plunge and move to the south coast where he developed a passion for the British seaside.

Andy’s work often includes subjects as diverse as modernist architecture; coastal landmarks from beach huts to bus shelters; transport; landscapes and seascapes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Hodgson

I am fascinated, overwhelmed and consumed by the surface of everything that bears and carries the mark of time and nature. The seemingly accidental markings and changes on an old metal fence appear to contain a hidden order and force which in my work I attempt to release to try and find its hidden meaning. To me these surfaces carry metaphysical meaning and are at all times, like ourselves, transforming.

Brian grew upon in the east end of Newcastle upon Tyne within sight of the cranes from the Swan Hunters and Neptune shipyards. You could walk up the Fossway and down Shields Road along the sides of Parsons engineering works, past long, never-ending rusting metal fences.

Steel was the lifeblood of this area for over 100 years, with iron ore turned into steel turned into ships, a giant industrial-scale transformation of materials that could only be halted by economics and politics.

When this transformation stopped, the steel rusted and started to degrade, and nature took over. There seemed to be a cycle of contracts being lost and the yards opening again. I saw a lot of fences around the area, and how they rusted and got painted again.

Working with sheets of corrugated metal that were originally part of a fence, I transformed the surface from one thing into something else: cycles of transformation and growth, and control and chance.

In Margate, and in particular on the Dreamland site, I have also found structures that exist in time and people’s memories. These structures are going through similar transformations of decline and potential renewal. In response to this I staged a ‘trans (action)’ which involved the creation of an image of the scenic railway using an accelerated process of destruction and metal oxidisation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucy Bainbridge

Lucy Bainbridge’s new series of screen prints on graphite, explore the effect of artificial light on the capital’s cityscape.
Photographs are taken during the late evening as the city’s lights are switched on, these photos are then manipulated into screen prints and printed over graphite, leaving the white of the paper to illustrate where the lights are.
The white of the paper becomes as important as the printed area, as the focus of the lights highlight the silhouettes of the familiar landmarks.

Since graduating from Camberwell College of Arts (University of Arts, London) Lucy Bainbridge has set up and now manages BAINBRIDGE STUDIOS, where she provides studio spaces and Open Access facilities. Additionally, she offers tuition in screen printing ranging from basic screen printing techniques to multi layered printing, colour separation and Photoshop. She is frequently called upon to fulfil commissions and is an established artist in her own right, having exhibited at many prestigious galleries in London, the United Kingdom and abroad.

Lucy Bainbridge’s new series of screen prints on graphite, explore the effect of artificial light on the capital’s cityscape.  Photographs are taken during the late evening as the city’s lights are switched on; these photos are then manipulated into screen prints and printed over graphite, leaving the white of the paper to illustrate where the lights are. The white of the paper becomes as important as the printed area, as the focus of the lights highlight the silhouettes of the familiar landmarks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neil Bottle

Bottle’s constant quest for perfection demands both discipline and a rigorous knowledge of his materials. In many ways these exuberant textiles reflect both the artist’s personality and his practice – an eclectic mix of architectural and geometric influences combined with signs and symbols underpinned by textual homage to the passing of time.

This mix is perhaps a reflection of Bottle’s decision to site his design studio on the East Kent Coast – an area where the tensions created between elemental landscape and urban regeneration combine to create a harmonious whole personified by his unique and limited edition textiles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mandy Quy-Verlander: 

I base much of my work on a photographic foundation but build on that through painting, drawing, Cyanotype and printing including working onto photographs using them as a tangible reference to the subject matter. I use ink, graphite, chalk and charcoal and sometimes add texture with mediums but also with dirt, sugar and found objects. I like my work to have a somewhat industrial feel to it.

With reference to mans intervention on the scene and how that affects us all, I concentrate on the objects on the landscape that could be described as spoiling it for example, structures such as pylons, telephone poles and gasholders but also places which have had some history but have seen better days and are now neglected and tired.

Mandy “As an artist I am quite experimental. I do like to see how the processes can take me from the original inspiration to the final piece. I have a fascination with industrial things, objects and buildings primarily, and things that generally people think of as ugly like graffiti, pylons etc. the derelict and forgotten. I like to try and transform these things into something more pleasing and intriguing, by using photography as a starting point much of the time, which I use in conjunction with printing and painting, sometimes onto the photographs themselves, and drawing. I also like to incorporate found objects like book pages or materials I have found at the scene that I mix in with the paint to add another dimension.”



 

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